[IC] An Experience in the Life of a Rookie Pilot

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[IC] An Experience in the Life of a Rookie Pilot

Postby Jacob Wolf » 26 Jul 2017, 08:57

((Sort of inspired by Jason's lore, along with an experience I had recently))
I was flying over reaper land when an alert for a new mission appeared on my PDA. After checking the most recent reports by our scouts of enemy activity, I decided to do mission alone, being the only one on-duty at the time. When I arrived at the mission, I landed and walked around, looking out for enemies. It took about half an hour till I decided there probably would not be enemies showing up, so I sat in a nearby chair to wait. After long enough of sitting there with no activity, I dozed off. Next thing I knew, someone was shouting, I heard the sound of a shotgun, and I had been wounded. When I came to again, I was at HQ, alone. I found it both annoying and dishonorable that someone would wound while I was sleeping, so, seeing on my PDA that mission was still active, I decided to do something about it. I donned my G-suit, used to protect me from the G-forces experienced while piloting fighter aircraft, and walked over to a G9 Eclipse that sat in the hangar, gathering dust between maintenance checks that seemed to be getting farther and farther apart. I put a simple wooden ladder up to the aircraft and climbed up, throwing it far aside once I was done. I entered the cockpit and went through the preflight checklist, glancing at instruments, flipping switches, and turning dials to ensure every part of the aircraft was working properly. Once I was done, I started the engines and made a radio call telling what I was taking and from which runway, as per procedure, even with no one around to hear it. I looked outside the cockpit as I taxied onto the runway, imagining comrades standing there, cheering me on, telling me to rain down hell on the enemies of the People. I shook my head slightly to dispel these thoughts, and slammed the throttle up to afterburner, accelerating down the runway, and pulled back first on the stick, and then shortly later on the throttle as I ascended and started to turn towards the mission area. It did not take very long to get there with the speed of the craft, and soon I was within a kilometer of mission. I adjusted the angle of the guns and rocket pods and then held down the trigger, sending hell raining down on the mission point. Sure that nothing could have lasted through that barrage, I looked back and was surprised to see a rocket streaking towards me from a hill above the mission I had just strafed. I immediately started turning sharply back and forth, knowing that rockets launched from shoulder-mounted anti-air rocket launchers tended to turn slowly. The rocket passed by me after my third turn, and then circled back around, head-on. I made a split-second decision and decided that playing "chicken" with a rocket was not a good idea, and pulled down close to the ground, watching as it curved down towards me. Then I pushed the throttle into afterburner and pulled up slightly, causing the rocket to overshoot and explode just past my left vertical stabilizer, sending a few pieces of shrapnel ricocheting off the armor of my craft. Glad to have made it out without any significant damage, I turned back towards point for another run to take down whoever had launched that rocket. Once I was in range again, I held the trigger and sent all my firepower down onto the hill the rocket had come from, certainly obliterating anyone stupid enough to hang around. As I pulled up and thought about going for another strafe of point, I spotted a small dot on the distance, probably an enemy pell. However, as I looked away while turning back around I suddenly heard a terrifying sound - rockets and mini gun fire. I looked back at where the dot had been before and saw a Leopard. I swear my heart almost stopped as I saw it... I had the ultimate "oh, shit" moment of any rookie pilot faced with such a situation. As the Leopard came towards me, firing away, I started to turn left and right frantically, then going up and down, anything to get it off my tail, panicking. Then, as the bullets were colliding with my craft, I had a moment of sobriety. In that moment I remembered a war story, of sorts, told of a master pilot who flew G9's like this years ago. He had come across a similar situation to this, if I remembered right and the tellings were correct, and he had used the G9's superior speed and greater wing surface to his advantage, out-climbing the Leopard and then coming back down to destroy it. I sure knew I didn't have quite that much skill with this plane, but I could use the principle. I pushed the throttle forward again, and pulled the stick almost against my chest, climbing at almost a seventy-five degree angle. The edges of my vision darkened slightly, but my suit did its job well and kept anything from happening beyond that. Looking back, I saw that the sudden rise seemed to have confused the Leo briefly, but it was starting to climb after me, firing all the way. I had a slight thought about how it must be wasting a lot of money in that much ammo for nothing, but dismissed he thought to concentrate on the situation at hand. Once I reached about 3500 meters, I quickly turned- if you can ever call turning in a g9 "quick"- and dived down past the slowly rising Leo. As he started to turn back downwards, I quickly pulled back into as a tight a turn as I could do and went back into straight flight and then started climbing again. I briefly considered making some attempt at destroying the Leo, but I figured I'd already be lucky to escape in one piece, so instead I again pushed the throttles to full in my climb, then leveled out at 4000 meters, and beat it out of the area with the Leopard still struggling to get back up to speed. As soon as the enemy craft went off radar, I pulled a hard left turn and flew over a remote area of the ocean to evade him if he attempted to follow me. After waiting long enough for the Leo to give up, I continued back to HQ and landed. As I taxied back to the hangar, after the "successful" mission, I pondered how I had almost lost the jet, twice, just because I wanted revenge, and I didn't even know if I had been successful in that. I climbed out of the cockpit, leaving the G9 in the hangar for a mechanic to find and repair eventually, as the sound of the engines faded, and there was silence. Absolute silence, once again.
I exist!... just so you know

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Re: [IC] An Experience in the Life of a Rookie Pilot

Postby Isabella Wolfy » 28 Jul 2017, 12:21

((good read, tho you should use paragraphs to keep your writing clear and easier to understand/read, good lore anyways :smile: ))

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Re: [IC] An Experience in the Life of a Rookie Pilot

Postby Jacob Wolf » 10 Oct 2017, 06:03

Yet Another Experience in the Life of, still, a Rookie Pilot
The First Dogfight

It was a fairly normal day. I was walking around HQ, contemplating whether I wanted to continue doing runs or wait for a mission. Then by PDA buzzed as it often did for another mission - this time, in co-operation with Enforcers. I communicated with the Major of the Enforcers and we decided to do the mission based on our combined reports of the current enemy activity. However, since said reports clearly stated the activity of a few Ulars and several Roaches, I decided the wisest course of action in this case would be to take a Leopard, which I had recently been training myself to use, to the mission. I donned my G-suit, which I was becoming more and more familiar with as I trained, and put my sturdy wooden ladder up to the side of the cockpit. Getting in, I threw the ladder to the side as always in the common absence of and comrades to aid me. Of course, I had long dispelled any thoughts of anyone being there to see me off, and I went through a cursory preflight, which I had long memorized, and stated the runway I intended to take off from, as always. I rammed the throttle to afterburner and pulled up shortly afterwards. I flew to mission, which required us to control a harbor till we could secure a vehicle.

Some Roaches and Ulars attempted to come against us, but they were easily defeated with guns and rockets from myself, and shots from the Enf Major's sniper rifle. However, something seemed to be not quite... right. It seemed like they weren't trying very hard... as if they were waiting for something else to come. We controlled the harbor for as long as we needed, and the vehicle ended up as a Sentinel - both a blessing and a curse, truly. A trained Recruit managed to get the mission, and the Enf left to get a K24 - presumably, he realized something like I did. I decided that whatever the Roaches and Ulars were planning was likely too dangerous to risk the Leopard.

However, before I had gotten even 5 kilometers away from the mission, I got a call from the radio that there were large amounts of Roaches dropping on and around the Sentinel, which was being taken into the water in an attempt to avoid all of the enemies. I certainly did not want to lose the mission, so I quickly turned around and went right back. When I got there I started bombing Roaches and the odd Ular as the dropped on mission. Before long, the Enf arrived in his K24 and started helping me. The area around the mission was soon clear, with only an occasional dropper. Then, out of nowhere came the long tracers from a G9's auto-cannons, hitting near to the mission, although the pilot was not very accurate. I started to pull onto the G9, and it soon saw me and began to engage into an elaborate series of turns - panicking, it seemed, even as I once did. And yet... even as I pulled the trigger intermittently, shots occasionally finding home in the tough armor.

Just as I started to consider trying to land rockets on the broad surface of it's forward-swept wings, however, I heard a familiar sound - one that I had come to know very well, as it was the very same sound I heard when I pulled the trigger myself, but without the vibration of the spinning mini-guns or the rockets streaking from their pods under me. It didn't exactly take long to guess what it was, especially with the tracers streaking past my tail. I immediately pulled the yoke hard to the left, leaving the G9 be for now, and I glanced behind me to see the Roach Leopard following roughly behind me. We started turning, with him starting behind and in a better position. He continued shooting his rockets and mini-guns at me, but he was not very good at aiming and managed to only barely scratch the armor on my tail assembly. However bad of a shot he was, though, I did not want to prolong this fight any longer than was necessary, and I decided to pull a trick that I had figured out months before in training, and that I was sure would work against an unexperienced pilot as this seemed to be. I briefly stopped the turn and instead threw the stick hard to the left and little forwards, turning my Leopard completely over. I briefly readied myself for what I was about to do, then pushed the yoke forwards as far as it would go, causing my plane to go upwards and end up upright, and quickly gaining a large amount of altitude in what I later learned was called a Reverse Immelmann. This sudden maneuver seemed to have confused the Roach Leo, which pitched sharply up, almost stalling as he tried to go back into a turn. However, it was too late for him - I was already turning and quickly getting back up to speed, and as he started his turn again, I was on top of him, hammering shots into the top of his craft. At this point, the pilot abandoned all pretense of order, turning this way in that in some attempt to throw my aim off and regain control of the dogfight. However, it was too late. My aim was certainly not the best of any pilot, but I was able to capitalize on my advantage and predict the pilot's moves, and it wasn't long till his Leo was smoking from the damage.

I was distracted as the G9 returned, firing at the general area, and he managed to get a good turn. I got behind him, but I wasn't quite in a position to shoot at him. I was about to pitch down in an attempt to gain enough speed to get a shot on him, when suddenly, from below, a missile came streaking up - from the now Ular-occupied Sentinel. The Enf K24 was down as well as the Recruit that previously had the mission, and so the Ular was attempting to help his comrades in the sky. I quickly evaluated the situation - dodge the rocket, probably lose my advantage, possibly lose my own Leo - or take the rocket in stride, despite the great damage it would do, and take down the enemy Leo. I decided the second option was the better of the two and pulled down - going towards the rocket, but gaining the advantage on the enemy Leopard. The rocket exploded violently, tearing a piece off of my right wing and sending shrapnel slicing through and along the armor, but at the same time I got the perfect position on the Roach Leo, and squeezed the trigger for the last time. Its armor had finally had enough, and the shots almost all got through, tearing through fuel in the wings and setting it all on fire. the Roach Leopard went spiraling down, and I had just enough time to glance at the parachute which soon sprouted from the blown off canopy before I maneuvered myself back behind the G9 as it went past from bombing my Recruit who had dropped on mission. This time, it kept going as my bullets plinked off its armor, doing real damage as the chinks and scratches turned into holes and gashes. It wasn't long till smoke started come off here and there and then across the whole craft, despite the great armor. This whole time, though, the G9 was accelerating away from the mission, and just before I could get the final shots in to take it down, it vanished into the distance, too far away for my relatively short-ranged mini-guns to reach.

I was far away from the mission at this point, and as I turned to go back and ensure we won the mission despite my heavy damages, I felt like my heart was going to come out of my chest, and I felt the adrenaline rushing through me as I never had before. I hadn't noticed it in the middle of the dogfight, but the "sweat" that seemed to be making the yoke and throttle slick was not, in fact, just sweat - it was sweat, mixed with various cuts all over my relatively unprotected arms from the few small pieces of missile shrapnel that had managed to penetrate the canopy,which had probably saved my life by holding up under it. It didn't take long to finish the mission after that, and I soon returned to HQ. As I approached the runway with my heavily damaged aircraft, the thankfully intact landing gear lowered with only a slight grating sound. I landed harder than normal and skidded slightly, but I soon came to a stop, and taxied the Leo into a hangar to be repaired whenever a mechanic could get to it. As I jumped down from the cockpit and went to the med bay to find medical with which to bandage my own wounds as always, I contemplated how differently this had gone from my previous missions. I had become more experienced - though I would still most certainly be classified as a "rookie" compared to any good pilot - and I had truly made the mission successful through my efforts combined with those of my comrades. This feeling made me smile despite the pain from bandaging my wounds, and although HQ was as silent as ever, it didn't feel quite so oppressive anymore.
I exist!... just so you know

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